Starting or Ending a Business (2004 IRS FAQ)

From TaxAlmanac, A Free Online Resource for Tax Professionals
Note: You are using this website at your own risk, subject to our Disclaimer and Website Use and Contribution Terms.

From TaxAlmanac

Jump to: navigation, search

IRS FAQ 12.9 Small Business/Self-Employed/Other Business  : Starting or Ending a Business



I am starting a small business. What assistance can IRS give me?

If you are starting or already have a small business and need information on taxes, recordkeeping, accounting practices, completing Federal business and employment tax returns, and meeting other Federal tax obligations, there is help available. Much of the assistance is free. The service is called Small Business Tax Education Program, or STEP. Go to Around the Nation for seminars in your area or check out Tax Info For Business on the IRS web site. You can find out more about this program for small business by referring to Publication 1066 (PDF), Small Business Tax Workshop, or Tax Help for Small Businesses and Self-Employed, Small Business Tax Education Program (STEP).

References:


How do I find out about whether or not my business needs to collect sales tax?

Your question is a state tax question. Your state revenue department should provide information regarding sales tax to you. To access the state you need to direct your question to, please go to our Alphabetical State Index.



I just started a small business and want to know if I have to file my income taxes quarterly or at the end of the year?

The Federal Income Tax return is filed annually. As a self-employed individual, if after deducting withholding and credits you expect to owe $1,000.00 at the end of the year, you should make estimated tax payments on a quarterly basis.Form 1040-ES (PDF), Estimated Tax for Individuals, will assist you in determining if estimated tax payments are due and how they are paid.

When you file the income tax return at the end of the year, you include the income from the business on the return. The forms to be filed are Form 1040 (PDF), U.S. Individual Income Tax Return, Form 1040, Schedule C (PDF), Profit or Loss from Business Form 1040, Schedule SE (PDF), Self-Employment Tax. If estimated tax payments where made during the year, they will be claimed on the individual income tax return as payments. See Form 1040, Line 57.

References:


Which form do I use to file my business income tax return?

To determine which form you should file for your business entity, select one of the following links:

. Publication 541, Partnerships

. Publication 542, Corporations

. Publication 3402 (PDF), Tax Issues for LLCs

. Publication 334, Tax Guide for Small Business

. Entities: Sole Proprietor, Partnership, Limited Liability Company/Partnership (LLC/LLP), Corporation, Subchapter S Corporation

References:


What is the due date for business returns?

Some forms and entities have due dates other than the well-known April 15th due date. The instructions for the each type of form used will have the appropriate due date(s) noted. In general, sole proprietor's schedule of income and expenses is attached to the 1040. Therefore, the due date is the same as the 1040.

A Corporation must generally use the calendar year, unless the entity can establish a business purpose for having a different tax year. The due date is usually March 15th.

A partnership generally must conform its tax year of the partners unless the partnership can establish a business purpose for having a different tax year. The tax year is the same as one or more partners that own (in total) more than a 50-percent interest in partnership profits and capital. If there is no majority interest tax year, the partnership must adopt the same tax year as that of its principal capital holder. Where neither condition is met, a partnership must use the calendar year. A limited Liability Company reporting as a partnership has the same tax year as a majority of its partners.

References:
  • Publication 541, Partnerships
  • Publication 542, Corporation
  • Publication 334, Tax Guide for Small Business
  • Entities: Sole Proprietor, Partnership, Limited Liability Company/Partnership (LLC/LLP), Corporation, Subchapter S Corporation

Source: IRS.gov

Personal tools