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Discussion:Vocabulary...

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Harry Boscoe (talk|edits) said:

12 February 2012
Once upon a time, like in an earlier millennium, an older professional impressed me by telling me with great conviction "We prepare the tax returns, but our clients file them." [It may have had something to do with which of us, the preparer or the client, was ultimately responsible for the information used in the tax return. That part of the lesson escapes me now.]

My question is, now, what is *today's* correct usage of the verb "to file" in that context. Has our vocabulary/usage/context/connotation/denotation changed so much that "to file" a tax return is no longer what only the taxpayer does, but now also includes something (excuse my lack of vocabulary in this area, but I have **never** "filed" a tax return for anyone but myself) the preparer does?

Do we now - and by whose authority - refer to preparers as "filing their clients' tax returns," i.e., submitting those returns electronically or otherwise?

Did this bastardization of the language of tax professionals happen overnight but unannounced, or did it happen slowly - erosively - over the past decade or more, during the time that electronic submission of tax returns by the preparers became more and more the rule...?

Pardon my Ludditism. Or is the correct word "Luddism"?

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

12 February 2012
Every time you use the wrong word

the errorists win.

Bottom Line (talk|edits) said:

12 February 2012
We could get really carried away with this. The butchering of the English language is like fingernails on a blackboard to me!!! My current cringe is the phrase "my wife and me..." instead of "my wife and I..."

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

12 February 2012
"My wife and I would like to invite you and your spouse to have dinner with my wife and I."

It is the butchering of the English language while it is still alive that really pisses me off!

Taocpa (talk|edits) said:

2012-02-12
Bottomline,

I cringe when I hear someone say, "irregardless". Ugh.

Tom

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

12 February 2012
@Taocpa ...and cringe even worser, I hope, when someone *writes* "irregardless"...!

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

12 February 2012
I literally cringe when I read the word 'irregardless'.

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

12 February 2012
Excellent!!

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

12 February 2012
"We prepare the tax returns, but our clients file them." [It may have had something to do with which of us, the preparer or the client, was ultimately responsible for the information used in the tax return. That part of the lesson escapes me now.]

Yup. That was the bossman's way of saying: hey don't look at us. That guy over there, the client, he filed it. We only prepared it.

Robbery vs. Burglary often gets my goat. People are robbed, homes are not robbed. "I was at work and my home got robbed." Heh. Heh.

The words burglary, burglar, burglarize, and burgle, burgled, and burgling are falling out of use. I had to look in the dictionary to find all these forms of use myself.

Bottom Line (talk|edits) said:

12 February 2012
"Went missing" is another one. How is this different from "is missing" or "disappeared"?

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

12 February 2012
@Bottom Line .. I *used to* curl up my nose at "went missing" but then I vetted it and now I use it with confidence. And with just a little prompting, you'll find yourself agreeing that it *does* say something that neither "was missing" nor "disappeared" says about the person who can't be found...

@Crow .. So "filing" a tax return doesn't any longer mean what it used to? Why didn't you point this out to me the instant you realized it was happening?

And Crow I totally appreciate your shared insight on Robbery and Burglary, etc. Do you likewise make the distinction between "breaking and entering" and "entering"?

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

12 February 2012
Have you guys heard the news reporters who think they are being cool by saying (about, say, a crime victim), "He is in critical" or "He is in stable", omitting 'condition'?

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

12 February 2012
You know what they say about me? "He's in active."

Bottom Line (talk|edits) said:

13 February 2012
Ok Spell Czech. Quick research looks like it's a British phrase that is now being used by US press. But I'm the first to admit that my knowledge of English and Grammer is sorely lacking.

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

13 February 2012
Grammer????? Where art thou, Kelsey?

Bottom Line (talk|edits) said:

13 February 2012
Grammar - I can't spell either.

Harry Boscoe (talk|edits) said:

13 February 2012
Just as long as they don't say that when I'm a-broad, like in Europe, that I'm in-continent...

ATM Machine
DMZ Zone
SEE Exam

EasternPA (talk|edits) said:

13 February 2012
>> Have you guys heard the news reporters who think they are being cool by saying (about, say, a crime victim), "He is in critical" or "He is in stable", omitting 'condition'?

Maybe it's not the reporter, but the sound byte editor trying to get best bang...

PirateCPA (talk|edits) said:

13 February 2012
"IRC Code Section", as quoted by the IRS.

Harry Boscoe (talk|edits) said:

13 February 2012
Excellent!

A local TV news reporter said - and this is *not* second-hand, I actually heard it: "...that life begins at contraception."

And that happened just a coupla days after another "TV news reader" said - again, I heard it myself, this isn't some internet-generated myth - "...that happened during Obama's pregnancy."

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

13 February 2012
EasternPA - sound byte?

EasternPA (talk|edits) said:

13 February 2012
Podolin, Yes. All editing now is done digitally! One byte stream after another.

Harry, many would now argue that personhood ends at contraception. Be careful you are not hauled off as a murderer. The Santorum Stasi will soon be bugging your bedroom to see if you are having sex for pleasure.

When that happens will PBR devotees be safe to pursue their ecstastic religious practices?

Mikex2e7n5 (talk|edits) said:

13 February 2012
EIN number SSN number TIN number

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

13 February 2012
@EasternPA .. Well, I'm pretty sure *one* of us is...

Szptax (talk|edits) said:

14 February 2012
Other Language pet peeves:
  • Dropping the "to be" in a sentence. "It needs washed." rather than the correct "It needs to be washed." This appears to be a CentralPAism (my word) and is repeated by locals with any similar action word ending in "ed": cleaned, fixed, cooked etc.
  • Another CentralPAism: Phrases that end in "at". Where is it at? Where you at? etc
  • Saying "Whatever" for no particular reason
  • referring to Soda as "Pop"

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

14 February 2012
Referring to Soda as 'Pop' may be a pet peeve, but is it incorrect? I say soda but I'm pretty sure pop is an acceptable synonym. Where I live, we like sandwiches called hoagies, but elsewhere they are subs, zeps, grinders or whatever. (I used that purposely).

I am pretty much a language purist; some have even said stickler. But I have mellowed with age, and have learned to understand and accept that language, especially English, changes and evolves. Are 'blog', 'webinar', and other 'techy' words only allowed to be used by 'nerds'?

That doesn't, however, mean that 'irregardless' is OK. Nor is it OK to ask 'my wife and I' out to dinner. Yet, even though 'none' is a singular pronoun, it seems widely accepted to make it plural in sentences such as 'none of my siblings are allowed to use incorrect English.'

Like, c'mon. man. ya know.

Natalie (talk|edits) said:

February 14, 2012
PIN number.

Szptax (talk|edits) said:

14 February 2012
haha - "Soda" versus "Pop" is definitely regional. I just threw it in there for fun. Because I'm in S. Central PA, relatively near the center of the state and along the Turnpike it very definitely identifies Someone from Western PA versus Eastern PA. Pittsburgh uses the term "Pop" and Philadelphia uses the term "soda". Just like "youz" and "yins".

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

14 February 2012
OK, group, how "technical" do you get? For instance. do you bite your lip when you hear either of these two impossible phrase? "I am taller than anyone in this room." "Your ideas are very unique."

Both of them bother me, but I have disciplined myself not to correct people who say them. One test I use - do I know what the errorist (thanks, Kevinh5) means?

EasternPA (talk|edits) said:

14 February 2012
Yous guys are a bunch of elitist snobs. Ya need to get down with da hood.

PirateCPA (talk|edits) said:

14 February 2012
I must not be technical - what's the problem with "your ideas are very unique?"

Taocpa (talk|edits) said:

2012-02-14
"Hot water heater" - now why in the heck do you need to heat hot water? It's a water heater.

In my neck of the woods, wash is sometimes "warsh". Drives me nuts. It's "WASH"!!! My sister-in-law and brother-in-law both say this and I can't stand it. Even my wife corrects them.

Tom

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

14 February 2012
"Unique" is absolute/non-gradable.

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

14 February 2012
I heard "warsh" while visiting Ohio, Virginia and North Carolina. I even heard "chichens" in reference to cats and kittens. "Simular" is popular too.

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

14 February 2012
Tom, do you have to check for the warsh sale rule when doing their returns? I don't know what could be worser than to be a winders warsher.

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

14 February 2012
I grew up in the east-end where many referred to windows as Tommy Trinders!

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

14 February 2012
"Well, the Phillies have a higher payroll than any team in the National League. This impossible statement is from today's Philadelphia Inquirer sports page.

Now, some would say it is picky, even elitist, to point out these errors. But, given what tax return preparers do for a living, and the preciseness needed in Code and Regulations, I'd say it is good to be correct.

PirateCPA (talk|edits) said:

14 February 2012
Would larger be correct there?

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

14 February 2012
No, the point is that the Phillies are in the National League, so they cannot have a higher (or larger) payroll than ANY team in that league, just any OTHER team. Their payroll cannot be higher than their payroll.

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

14 February 2012
Maybe they're no longer in the National League?

PirateCPA (talk|edits) said:

14 February 2012
Ah, I was too caught up with absolutes and gradable/non-gradable. The more you know...

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

14 February 2012
I am particularly bothered by the use of "a couple..." without the absolutely necessary "of" following it, as for example in "Me and a couple buddies was out drinking beer and we seen a couple hotties in the parking lot...." Doesn't that sentence scream out for "of" between "couple" and "buddies" as well as between "couple" and "hotties"?

And I'm quite annoyed by the proliferation of "as well" as well.

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

14 February 2012
"Luddism" or "Ludditism"? Got me!

Captcook (talk|edits) said:

14 February 2012
Tom, I live in Washington State and used to work for a guy that ALWAYS pronounced it WaRshington. Like a steering wheel in my pirate pants--It drove me nuts.

Szptax (talk|edits) said:

14 February 2012
Find the error:

full article @ www.abc27.com http://www.abc27.com/story/16927975/man-wishes-he-shot-burglar


"It's a great safety concern because obviously this guy is very brazen," he said. "(The burglar) is going in at night-time to occupied houses. The actually is that residents are confronting him, so anything can happen. The tendency for violence is there now."

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

14 February 2012
Spell Czech, at least your example only had one error. for example in "Me and a couple buddies was out drinking beer and we seen a couple hotties in the parking lot...." Doesn't that sentence scream out for "of" between "couple" and "buddies" as well as between "couple" and "hotties"?

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

14 February 2012
Szptax, I'd say the error is either "actually" should be "actuality" or the guy should have shot the burglar.

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

14 February 2012
Writer or editor couldn't find 'actuality' in the thesaurus. And what is wrong with using the old B&E for 'going in.' 'The burglar is breaking and entering occupied houses at night' sounds a little better but I bet Mr. Czech will improve my try.

I recall the classic from the Annenberg-owned paper in town: At the opening of the new police station, Mayor Tate unveiled a plague......then again this was simple misspelling, though Annenberg detested Democrats (JFK came to Independence Hall to give the Medal of Freedom to ????? There was a Democrat fundraiser/fixer named Matt McCloskey who was never mentioned in Walter's paper. JFK and ? (make it Willy Brandt) stood on the podium while the photographers snapped their pictures. As they were doing so, McCloskey popped between the two, saying to our President, "Let's see that bastard keep me out of the picture today." The next morning the Inquirer had a lovely shot of Brandt & Kennedy with a large gray area in between.....they airbrushed him out.

Bracket Creep (talk|edits) said:

14 February 2012
"I laid prostate at her feet." Really?

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

14 February 2012
Oh my, I just remembered another one that really gets to me. My car is faster then yours. Besides, his isn't!

Okie1tax (talk|edits) said:

15 February 2012
I am presently rechecking a tax return.

The tornado decimated Joplin completely.

Taocpa (talk|edits) said:

2012-02-15
"It was a dark and stormy night; the rain fell in torrents — except at occasional intervals, when it was checked by a violent gust of wind which swept up the streets (for it is in London that our scene lies), rattling along the housetops, and fiercely agitating the scanty flame of the lamps that struggled against the darkness."

How many remember this literary gem?

Tom

Bottom Line (talk|edits) said:

15 February 2012
The generic term for soda or pop in the South is coke. "What kind of coke do you want?" "I'll have a Pepsi."

Szptax (talk|edits) said:

15 February 2012
Other often confused words:

your, you're and you are


affect and effect

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

15 February 2012
oh, those two are real good to(o)

Deback (talk|edits) said:

February 15, 2012
Bottom Line -

Do you also cringe when you hear THE wife and me...? Thats a little different THEN My wife and me... Irregardless their both cringable especially when your use to the proper way off righting it.

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

15 February 2012
Ah, Tom, Bulwer-Lytton. In 2003 I used him as a foil in one of my monthly Mystery Newsletters for Writing.com, picturing him using those words from Paul Clifford to depict D.B. Cooper:

'How Bulwer-Lytton tracked me down at my new house I will never know, but there he was, standing on the front step as I opened the door. The double-barrel shotgun unnerved me. As an editor, I have often dealt with angry writers, but most don't pull a gun. Pam shows her disagreement by usurping the quilt on cold nights. Others call me names. This was different; here was an author on my front step, hell-bent on sending me to the Editor's Burial Ground. I pointed out to him that I had awarded him a prize but this did not salve the wound.

"Sir, you accused me of borrowing, plagiarizing if you will, this story."

"That is not what I wrote at all. I gave you the prize for writing about an unsolved mystery. Too many pieces in this genre are tied up too neatly for my taste; not every crime has to be solved. Your piece is a breath of fresh air, fully deserving the award. I was only trying to point out in my essay that the character Paul Clifford may have been based on Dan Cooper, D. B. Cooper to people over age forty. On Thanksgiving Eve, November 24, 1971, using the threat of a bomb, Cooper commandeered a Northwest Airlines flight out of Portland, Oregon, demanding that four parachutes and $200,000 in cash be delivered to him when the plane landed at its destination, Seattle. When these were produced, he ordered the pilot to fly to Mexico, giving the crew a precise speed and altitude. He bailed out over southern Washington and was never found. Can you see the similarity in the story?"

"I will grant you that, but I'd never heard of this Cooper fellow. Good lord, I am 200 years old; you can't expect me to remember everything."

"Don't feel bad; you may have encountered him on the Internet."

"Internet?"

too long except for this excerpt.

Taocpa (talk|edits) said:

2012-02-15
David,

I love that every year a bad writing contest is held in his name. Of course, how could someone who gave us "the pen is mightier than the sword" give us such drivel.

That remains a great mystery.

Tom

Bottom Line (talk|edits) said:

16 February 2012
I learned to decide whether to use I or me with another person by taking the other person out of the sentence. In other words, would you say, "Me went to the store" or "I went to the store"? Since you would say "I went to the store", that means you would say "My wife and I went to the store".

Szptax (talk|edits) said:

16 February 2012
The use of "well" versus "good".

http://grammar.quickanddirtytips.com/good-versus-well.aspx

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

16 February 2012
OK, it's busy season, so this is just for the few who consider this topic to be a pleasant diversion. There is a book, published in 2011, called Robert Hartwell Fiske's Dictionary of Unendurable English. (You will need to ascertain the author's name on your own). It is not exactly scholarly in nature, nor is it solely humorous, but both descriptions apply. The back cover describes it as "A COMPREHENSIVE, AUTHORITATIVE, CHARMINGLY GRUMPY COMPENDIUM OF MISUSE OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE". It has hundreds, or maybe thousands, of entries. Here are a few:

anyways should be anyway, graduated college should be graduated from college, supercede should be supersede, baited breath should be bated breath.

It also explains the right way to use "decimate" and "presently" (see Okie1tax above), and clarifies the meanings of "affect" and "effect".

I think mostly nerds and sticklers will find this book enjoyable. I do not think TA has any such contributors.

Bottom Line (talk|edits) said:

17 February 2012
Just learned something from your example. I'm the first to admit that I'm a nerd. Sounds like an interesting book.

Belle (talk|edits) said:

February 17, 2012
"..baited breath should be bated breath" (I dunno, doesn't that depend on whether you had tuna fish for lunch?)

Moot point vs mute point

Tax'es (I have one client that does this in every email he sends)

Separate vs seperate

Principal or principle

Their, there, they're

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

17 February 2012
Desperate, desparate

Principal or principle - see my too subtle shot at this on this Discussion:Purchase of distressed debt, where the OP misused "principal" as "principle" when referring to debt. I said "and covers pretty much all you will need to know, I think. In principle, anyway, at least as to principal payments." We sticklers need to be heard! Or is it us sticklers?

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

17 February 2012
I thought you would send him to the Principle's office, Pods.

They desserted me to eat desert.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

18 February 2012
"They desserted me to eat desert." Yes, but they ate it in the hot, dry dessert.

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

18 February 2012
Here is one no one mentioned and that I cringe when I read it or hear it:

SLIPPERY SLOPE

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

18 February 2012
@Podolin .. and sometimes "disparate"...

"Too subtle" my ass. You underestimate us. LMAO

"I think mostly nerds and sticklers will find this book enjoyable. I do not think TA has any such contributors." Well, speak for yourself!! ROTFLMAO!

"He got his just deserts, eating just desserts in the hot, dry desert."

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

18 February 2012
Deservedly so.

Wiles (talk|edits) said:

19 February 2012
My wife says "irregardless" all the time. I dont have the guts/cajones to tell her that it is not a word. I hear it about 12 times a day, and every time, I cringe. Can one of you people please call her and tell her to stop? Please!

Thanks for letting me vent. I gotta get dinner going now, and I still need to *unthaw* the chicken.

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

19 February 2012
Then we have 'disrespect' or as said on The Soprano's, 'disrespected.' 'He disrespected' The Bing.' In fact that show put quite a few phrases into common talk that were used too much. "Not for nothing," which my stepson uses all the time. "With all due respect" is one we could textize into WADR.

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

19 February 2012
"*Unthaw*" .. Wonderful, subtle, understated...

And then there's "acknowledgment" vs. "acknowledgement"

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

20 February 2012
I thought there would be less examples, but the fewer mistakes, the better it is.

Will there be a verbal exam? No, just an oral one, but only use numbers - no words.

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

20 February 2012
What's wrong with slippery slope?

Accept and except. Alternately and alternatively.

Harry Boscoe (talk|edits) said:

20 February 2012
Not to mention lay, lie, lain, laid, lied and layed.

Deback (talk|edits) said:

February 20, 2012
Your all rite, per say -- and that.

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

20 February 2012
"What's wrong with slippery slope?"

Every pundit in the country uses it when a pundit with an opposite view suggests something.

My favorite pundit story, written in 2000. http://www.writing.com/main/view_item/item_id/209834-LANGUAGE-MARCHES-ON

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

20 February 2012
paradigm.....the article reminded me to that word.

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

20 February 2012
I see. I thought you were pointing out a technical floor. I will read some of your stories and discussions D&T.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

20 February 2012
What is a technical floor?

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

20 February 2012
Subsequently, consequently.

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

20 February 2012
Remember 'The dead cat bounce?'

http://www.investopedia.com/terms/d/deadcatbounce.asp#axzz1mwvlLk3l

Funny the first time you hear it but.......

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

20 February 2012
"What is a technical floor?"

Depending on the context (and the reader), a "technical floor" could mean a living room floor tiled with solar powered heat generating functional scientific calculators or a poor attempt at humor.

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

20 February 2012
When I hear "technical floor" I think about a floor to a market price using technical analysis, so that may be another meaning.

(I'm not a technical analyst. I think it's an occupation for people who like to keep themselves busy with numbers and patterns to hide the fact they have no idea how to really analyze a market.) But it keeps them busy. 200 years ago, these same people read tea leaves.

Personally, I've always had trouble with horse and house. It started when I was in third grade. I've told this story. I don't know how many times I went to buy a horse and instead bought a house, and vice versa.

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

20 February 2012
Another type 'slang' that I hate is the bastardization of athletes' names: T-Mac, LinSanity,

Wiles (talk|edits) said:

20 February 2012
How often do you hear the word "literally" precede an exaggeration?

I literally hear that about 1,000 times a day. I literally scream my head off everytime.

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

20 February 2012
I dislike "pop culture" in most forms, especially language but I still appreciate some cockney slang when flowing naturally and unforced from a "proper Londoner's" north and south.

Businesses can be awful offenders. "Moredinary" was used in an advertisement on the radio today.

Taocpa (talk|edits) said:

2012-02-20
David,

I am with you on the name bastardization. I like Tim Tebow, but the "Tebowing" reference has to end. We have "Ovechcam" here. I love Alex Ovechkin, but I have tuned that out.

Synergy is another word used too often. I have been at presentations where every speaker used it. At one point, I told the person I was with I was going ballistic at the next use of the word. Sure enough, it was used and I went nuts on the poor guy.

Tom

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

20 February 2012
Core Competency, Corporate Values and Best Practice cause me to tense up.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

20 February 2012
"Moredinary" was used in an advertisement on the radio today. It gets worse. Some outfit on a radio station I listen to claims they customize a miortgage for you. They call it a "yourgage". Horrible.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

20 February 2012
Core Competency, Corporate Values and Best Practice cause me to tense up. as does "roll it out", in context of, say, "Let's roll out our new vision."

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

20 February 2012
One in every three new businesses fail within the first five years of operation.

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

20 February 2012
I can't top "yourgage" or "roll it out" but I can offer "Git-r-done!"

"Yourgage" is worser than anything I've heard in a while. It really is awful.

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

20 February 2012
I am with you on the name bastardization. I like Tim Tebow, but the "Tebowing" reference has to end.

The poor man. Now that he's being idolized, it's almost preordained that he must meet with some disgrace: a Tebow-gate of some kind.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

21 February 2012
Belle - "Moot point vs mute point" All of these posts are mute and even a mute court would say so.

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

21 February 2012
Did bastardization all start with A-ROD?

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

21 February 2012
Or was it J-LO?

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

24 February 2012
tortious, torturous, tortuous - 3 very different meanings!

It felt torturous on that hot, sticky day when I had to walk a tortuous course to win a prize, while trying hard not to negligently injure a spectator, thereby acting tortiously. (Some people talk this way). Professors, writers, lawyers, tax preparers.

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

25 February 2012
tort or torte. I guess we are lucky the King of Hearts ate his tarts, and not torts.

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

25 February 2012
...fort, forte, and forte...

Somebody mentioned "paradigm." What are the *two other* words that end in "-gm"?

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

25 February 2012
I am a classical music fan, and a few weeks ago attended a Philadelphia Orchestra concert. The next day, a review appeared in the newspaper. It contained this sentence, which to me is the ultimate in snobbish writing. And no, I do not know what it means and have not looked up the words. "On one level, given the imminent exit of Dutoit himself, this was a gathering of talent limned in elegiac grisaille."

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

25 February 2012
At least you and I know how to spell "Detroit"...

Wouldn't "conflation" instead of "gathering" have put this review even farther over the rainbow?

I hope the music was good.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

25 February 2012
Was great! And, when Detroit exits, where will it go?

MWPXYZ (talk|edits) said:

25 February 2012
"What are the *two other* words that end in "-gm"? " Auto Industry?

MWPXYZ (talk|edits) said:

25 February 2012
However, 'phlegm' is probably half of what you were thinking of.

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

25 February 2012
Yup, number of words, exactly half.

Number of letters, however, less fewer than half, and number of syllables, *way* less fewer than half as many.

Wiles (talk|edits) said:

26 February 2012
It's both a muscle and a contraceptive.

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

26 February 2012
Kudos to Wiles.

MWPXYZ (talk|edits) said:

26 February 2012
Some websites indicate that there are 6 words that end in -gm, but I didn't dig further to figure out what they meant or if they are real words.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

26 February 2012
Diaphragm. Politically incorrect?

Szptax (talk|edits) said:

27 February 2012
I don't think this error was mentioned yet:

then and than

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

27 February 2012
Actually, it sorta, like, ya know, man, was. Even worse, my son is the biggest offender I know on this one.

"14 February 2012 Oh my, I just remembered another one that really gets to me. My car is faster then yours. Besides, his isn't!"

Wiles (talk|edits) said:

27 February 2012
My brother and a client of mine both use the possessive form of the word I. Example: "Enclosed is Sandy and I's medical expenses."

My wife used "irregardless" 5x this weekend. Make it stop!!

Szptax (talk|edits) said:

27 February 2012
Do others find themselves correcting the grammar of others either audibly or silently in your head? I do this all the time!

Szptax (talk|edits) said:

27 February 2012
another one: The use of couple versus few.

couple = two few = more than 2

I have a couple of questions. That's two questions so don't ask 3 or more.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

27 February 2012
"I do this all the time!" Yes, unfortunately I have that affliction. I am trying to break myself of it by only correcting them in my head, not out loud, but I still slip sometimes. I am told I am being rude.

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

27 February 2012
"I do this all the time!" Yeah, most of us do, to a greater or lesser degree.

I just go online at TaxAlmanac and fix you folks' spelling, grammar, punctuation, context, content, and occasionally even formatting. More often than not, you don't even realize your stuff has been fixed.

Occasionally, someone complains, but you know who you are...

Deback (talk|edits) said:

February 28, 2012
I could care less about tax season this year!

You ask, "How much less could you care?"

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

28 February 2012
Deback, that is an excellent one. Bothers me every time I hear it.

Taocpa (talk|edits) said:

2012-02-29
I was listening to the radio today and I heard a radio personality say "you know" 3 times in 5 seconds. Why he is not fired for this, I cannot explain.

Taocpa (talk|edits) said:

2012-02-29
I was listening to the radio today and I heard a radio personality say "you know" 3 times in 5 seconds. Why he is not fired for this, I cannot explain.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

29 February 2012
Perhaps the radio station management could "care less".

Szptax (talk|edits) said:

29 February 2012
Spell Czech - I think you corrected a typo of mine. I logged in to correct my error & someone already had. You are quick!

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

29 February 2012
More often than not, you don't even realize your stuff is being fixed...

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

29 February 2012
Ingenuitive.

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

29 February 2012
Februany. It hurts.

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

29 February 2012
Thanks to D&T for the reminder.

Foodie.

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

29 February 2012
Had a few reminders from clients today.

Wary/Weary. Clueless.

Today's abused word is irony/ironic/ironically. Not a soul knows what irony is, apparently.

"You're from England....that's so ironic, my best friend's mum was born in England."

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

29 February 2012
"Not a soul knows what irony is, apparently."

If I told you once, I told you a thousand times, don't exaggerate.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

1 March 2012
If I told you once, I told you a thousand times, don't exaggerate. Literally.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

1 March 2012
"Literally." Wait, I meant "figuratively". (A thousand....)

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

1 March 2012
Are the remarks in our lunch discussion about Davy Jones and his diet an example of irony.

"Will Turner: You knew my father. Pintel: Old Bootstrap Bill? Aye, we knew 'im. Never sat well with ol' Bootstrap, what we did to Sparrow and all. That's why he sent a piece of the treasure off to you, as it were. He said that we deserved to be cursed... and remain cursed. A' course, that didnt sit too well with the captain.

Ragetti: No, that didn't sit to well with the cap'n at all... Tell 'im what Barbossa did.
Pintel: [angry] I'm telling the story. So, what Barbossa did is, he tied a cannon to Bootstrap's bootstraps.
Ragetti: [snickering quietly] Bootstrap's bootstraps... 

Pintel: And the last we saw of ol' Bill Turner, he was sinkin' into the crushing black oblivion of Davy Jones' Locker. Course, it was only after that we learned we needed his blood to lift the curse.

Ragetti: Now that's what you'd call ironic."

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

1 March 2012
From these very fora [yeah, that's a *plural* of "forum"...]:

First there was "...and who to blame (and it is not IRS)...." Then just a bit later, this: "...and Jim Fox (whomever he is)...."

I guess I can't complain too much: at least they - the "who" and the "whom" - cancel each other out!!

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

2 March 2012
its, it's.

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

2 March 2012
You - all y'all - should read Lynne Truss's book on punctuation. In it, she gives us the Law of Conservation of Apostrophes: "For every apostrophe omitted from an "it's" there is an extra one put into an "its." Thus the number of apostrophes in circulation at any given time is constant."

The book is titled Eats, Shoots and Leaves (Gotham Books 2003) and the author is described by some as the Punctuation Nazi. The book's a hoot and some of you might do well to see if you might *learn* something from it.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

2 March 2012
Spell Czech, I will read that book! You do know, however, that there are some people (even some TA contributors) who call us nerds, elitists, and worse because of our "sticklerness". But to me it's worth it; lacking in tax skills, I can always fall back on English. Wait, not "fall back on..."; that might hurt English and me.

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

3 March 2012
Now I hate to be a stickler but it's "American English." Even Spell Czech would be bang to rights in blighty. It's taken me a long time to get used to the wrong way of writing. I have a way to go, but I'll get there.

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

3 March 2012
@Podolin .. Stick and stones and all that. They can call me anything in the book as long as they spell it correctly and don't muck up the punctuation. On the other hand, I am too polite - that's my Mother's doing - to call them what you and I think they should be called.

@Ukbones .. Ms Truss is quite careful in her book to point out frequently the differences in punctuation 'tween youse guys and us folks. And she's not really *rude* about it at all. My Grandmother on my Father's side would have said "a ways to go" but the other Grandma would have said, as you do, "a way to go". Lynne Truss would have that "." outside the quotation marks, but allows for another choice... Yes, Bones, we've all got a way(s) to go, and bless you for striving to meet us halfway, at least.

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

3 March 2012
"When in Rome..."

If only I had made it half way Mr. Czech - I still tend to make a mess. In both countries.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

3 March 2012
I really need to know if I am alone in being offended by this: In disasters (tornadoes, floods, fires, terrorist attacks, etc.), I see and hear reports of the death of "dozens" of people. To me (and this is where I may be alone), that term de-humanizes the dead. I know they are saying the exact number is not yet known, and it approximates 12, or 48, or some number close to a multiple of 12, but for reasons I cannot adequately explain, I'd prefer to see or hear, for example, that the fire took the lives of about 25 people, not 2 dozen. Am I nuts? (Separate question, I realize, but kindly base the answer just on this one quirk).

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

3 March 2012
A dozen eggs, a dozen roses, a dozen cupcakes, fine, but a dozen people? No.

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

3 March 2012
If I heard "a dozen people perished" it would be offensive to me too. They wouldn't say "a baker's dozen perished in the fire."

A dozen to me is a group of twelve "things."

Flagged as inappropriate in my mind.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

3 March 2012
Thanks, Ukbones. A dozen to me is a group of twelve "things." This is precisely my point. Does a jury consist of 12 of your peers, or a dozen of your peers? The connotation of the latter is they can be just any of millions of interchangeable people. In fact, they are individually selected.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

3 March 2012
"a dozen cupcakes", now that I think about it, would be thirteen. I think I think too much.

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

3 March 2012
A client threw "reoccurence" at me this morning.

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

3 March 2012
Did it hurt?

I care that they pay me, not how they talk to me.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

3 March 2012
You are entirely too forgiving, D&T, to belong to the Stickler Club. We may have trouble keeping clients and paying our bills, but we are great at insulting them regarding their mistakes. Priorities!

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

3 March 2012
I ducked just in time, meditated for a moment and let go.

Szptax (talk|edits) said:

3 March 2012
Podlin - In the context of "dozens of people" the people are "things" in that they are a noun or object. You might say, hundreds or tens of thousands. You could have hundreds of cupcakes or hundreds of people.

That said, I don't count in twelves. It would be odd to hear tens of people though. It would not be odd to say as many as two dozen were injured. I understand the context of your objection. It is dehumanizing. However I don't think it is gramatically incorrect.

Spell Czech where are you?

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

3 March 2012
However I don't think it is gramatically incorrect. I too don't think it is grammatically incorrect.

Wiles (talk|edits) said:

3 March 2012
I can't believe I forgot about this one until now!!! The use of the word gender as a substitute for sex. When did the word "sex" become politically incorrect? And if it is, then they need to think of a better substitute because "gender" is not a synonym for "sex".

When I see the question on an application, I like to circle (F) because I have many feminine traits, like man-boobs and I change my mind often.

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

3 March 2012
In response to Podolin's "I really need to know if I am alone..."

I never thought about the dehumanization of the dead by media reporting, but now that I've been sensitized, it has very quickly become quite puzzling, quite irritating, and I'll have to think about it some more. You are not alone.

Is this a version or close relative of "The crew was killed" vs. "the crew were killed"?

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

3 March 2012
The word "gender" has always been correct. Ask my Grandmother, she'll tell you. Uh .. maybe she won't.

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

3 March 2012
"The crew was killed" is American English and "the crew were killed" is British English, correct? Or are both acceptable here? "The crew was killed" still sounds wrong after many years.

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

3 March 2012
Nicer to say the crew went missing and are presumed dead. Or do I have to put 'to be' dead.

When I wrote 240 or so monographs, most 1200 or so words, when I was coping with my late wife's illness and subsequent death, I would polish them and polish them, and do it some more, trying to produce something of lasting value.

Harry asks, "Did this bastardization of the language of tax professionals happen overnight but unannounced, or did it happen slowly - erosively - over the past decade or more, during the time that electronic submission of tax returns by the preparers became more and more the rule...?" I think it has something to do with instant communication that is the norm today. "Did you get my email?" A phrase like that begs an instant response with little though to how that response is phrased. I hope I don't sound like I am writing an alibi....it is just the way it is. People want things now.....I think it started when the fax replaced letters, even overnight letters. Clients would fax and call a few minutes later.

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

3 March 2012
Lizzit works for an accountancy firm over in London that traces it lineage all the way back to Scrooge. When she speaks of the firm, she uses the "were" to devastating effect. "The firm were pleased that last years revenue was up by 20%." An American accountant stands no chance against such talk, and I've seen several of our boys wilt in the lobby of an English firm after hearing far less of it.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

3 March 2012
I was interviewed out of college by just such a firm (maybe that very firm) but I went elsewhere. last years revenue was up by 20% might be "last year's revenue were up..." but I doubt it (not the 20%, the "were").

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

3 March 2012
Here's perhaps the greatgranddaddy of the "crew is/crew are" dilemma:

"The posse had its picture taken and then rode away on their horses."

It *can't* be fixed, or so my Mother, a professional copy editor, told me many years ago.


On the other hand, maybe it's just a question of what the media does today. Like, does the media treat vocabulary and grammar as "prescriptive" or "descriptive"?


Did you miss it? I'll bet you did! How many *"media"* do you think there are? Just One? Well, let's think again, okay?

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

4 March 2012
what the media does today. what the media do today. The amount of media, the number of media. (Or, if you know the Philly burbs as D&T does, the town of Media).

Wiles (talk|edits) said:

4 March 2012
Spell Czech, I can't tell if you were serious regarding gender vs. sex? Do you believe these have *always* been synonymous?

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

4 March 2012
What I was really reaching for (maybe over-reaching...) was that *for my Grandmother* there was *only* the word "gender." The idea that we might even be thinking the word "sex" when we asked the *gender* of barnyard animals was simply unthinkable. We were not allowed to say "navel" in her presence, and on and on and on. I'm not sure what word she used for the act of sex; I suspect she may never have said the word, whatever it was!

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

4 March 2012
On State Street, that great street.....where the trolley runs down the middle!

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

4 March 2012
That's it Podolin: "The firm were pleased that last year's revenue were up by 20%". That's really gilding the lily. I love it.

Szptax (talk|edits) said:

4 March 2012
Podolin - oops - darn, that typo!

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

4 March 2012
Anyone remember how the pronunciation of the word 'defense' was bastardized by football fans 50 years ago or so?

DEEEE-FENCE

Imagine, UK, the DEEE-FENCE of the realm?

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

4 March 2012
OK, D&T, I agree. But who bastardized "permit" when it is used as a noun, or "insurance"? I grew up understanding that the accent was on the second syllable when permit was a verb, but the first syllable when it is a noun. And insurance always has the accent on the second syllable, but I hear it spoken with the first accented. I have not looked up any of it.

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

4 March 2012
My bad, I was on the phone talking with a client who, with his brother, formed an LLC for their rental property in NYC (they have held it for years). We were talking about the forms that had to be filed and whether brother's accountant or self would prepare them. When I mentioned issuing K-1s, my client said, "That's the form my brother was talking about." I then committed a faux pas. 'A partnership is the deee-fault way to file.' My tongue is still bleeding from biting it.

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

5 March 2012
How about deee-pot (not sure of the correct American pronunciation)? After landing in London after an 18 month absence I said bus deee-pot and the whole of London stood still and stared.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

5 March 2012
How do Brits say it?

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

6 March 2012
Deppo.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

6 March 2012
Live and learn. I'm off to Home Deppo to buy nails.

Szptax (talk|edits) said:

8 March 2012
The use of "my bad" instead of "sorry", "my mistake" or a complete apology.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

8 March 2012
Compound modifiers, as in this Discussion:I need help with an ugly vehicle issue, where it is unclear whether it is the vehicle or the issue that is ugly. A well-placed hyphen might help.

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

8 March 2012
If you keep this up, gang, no one will post!

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

8 March 2012
A client insists on referring to his WLAN (Wireless Network) as "will-an." His "will-an" is always down.

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

8 March 2012
Comptroller, Controller

I note the State of Maryland has the check go to the Comptroller of Maryland.....I wonder how many know what a Comptroller is. I am not sure I know anymore, but I recall 40 years ago, it was an honorable job.

Harry Boscoe (talk|edits) said:

8 March 2012
Deppo. One of the Narx Brothers...

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

9 March 2012
Principle residence made an appearance again in the Tax forum

Harry Boscoe (talk|edits) said:

10 March 2012
I *just* got the one about the steering wheel in my pirate pants/it drove me nuts!! Maybe I should perk my coffee the night before...

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

11 March 2012
I need the help of the vocabulary section of TA to decipher this statement by Kroger regarding the "pink slime" controversy. Pink slime is also known as finely textured ground beef, which is tiny bits of meat torn off the bone by giant machines with claws attached to a rotating drum. The "beef" is piled up, and then washed with ammonia to kill any bacteria (I think it's washed with ammonia).

Here is the statement:

“We do not use finely textured beef in our FRESH ground beef. … We are routinely presented the finely textured beef as an option, but have always refused.”

[Emphasis Mine]

Isn't this statement meaningless unless we are provided the definition of "fresh"? For instance, most beef is not ground in the store anymore because most grocery stores don't hire real butchers, and untrained high school degreed employees cannot be trusted with machines. So if pre-packaged beef is ever frozen, is it fresh once it thaws in store; and if it's not considered fresh can it contain the slime?


http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2012/03/where-you-can-get-pink-slime-free-beef/

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

11 March 2012
As a JD, you are a highly-trained interpreter of mumbo jumbo language.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

12 March 2012
Spelling quiz for Spell Czech. [[1]]

Harry Boscoe (talk|edits) said:

13 March 2012
Child's play. Try this one: Which of the words *in the quiz* is spelled two *different* ways in the Internal Revenue Code?

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

13 March 2012
Len, why are you trying so hard to just hand out my proprietary material? You're just giving it away...

Now the unwashed will have no excuse whatsoever.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

13 March 2012
disperse, disburse. In a news article today, a sentence read something like this: The Government is finding it harder to disperse funds for "green" manufacturing since the Solyndra bankruptcy. At first, I was sure the right word was "disburse", but technically either fits.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

13 March 2012
my proprietary material How much is the royalty?

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

13 March 2012
: Which of the words *in the quiz* is spelled two *different* ways in the Internal Revenue Code? Judgment, judgement? Just guessing.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

13 March 2012
withhold, withold?

deductible, deductable?

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

13 March 2012
dependent, dependant?

occurrence, occurrance?

In multiple-choice tests, pure guesses can hit the right answer sometimes.

Harry Boscoe (talk|edits) said:

13 March 2012
"...pure guesses can hit the right answer sometimes." "Sometimes" hasn't arrived yet.

Actually, your guesses are all quite good, but sadly, they're not right. [Yes, they are being not right in a sad manner, according to some grammar-grinding nun somewhere.]

I could tell you the Code Section, but that would be a dead giveaway (and take away all the fun, too).

Footnote: I'm not totally sure that none of the words you suggested are *not* spelled in two or more different ways in the Code, but there *is* one that I *know* is...

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

14 March 2012
Sec. 170 acknowledgment, acknowledgement

Harry Boscoe (talk|edits) said:

14 March 2012
Yeah, Buddy. PBR's on it's weigh.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

15 March 2012
"It's the principal of the thing," said the teacher with bad ratings as he quit before being fired.

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

15 March 2012
Meanwhile, in the desert, the Arabs were eating their dates.

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

19 March 2012
To further expand upon earlier examples of pleonasms, this weekend my father in-law ordered a Roast Beef Sandwich with au jus. He rarely offers to pay (this occasion being no different) but we were informed that he had cash money if we *wanted* him to pay.

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

19 March 2012
"with au jus" is precious. Deja vu all over again.

I have always divided money into three types when doing billing and collecting: credit (credit card, debit card), cash which is a check to me, and 'cash-cash' which is good ole green filthy lucre. Years ago I had three or four clients who had limo services (livery was the term) and who mostly drove for funeral homes.....they would always pay in 'cash-cash.' And they would pay everything....if there were taxes, they'd give you the cash to write checks on your account for them. So I would have assumed Dad wanted to pay with a check money, not cash-cash money.

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

19 March 2012
Your guess is as good as mine. On the occasions he paid, my attention was swiftly diverted to his attempt to punish me with guilt for he now has to sacrifice some other essential life item to cover the tab. "Now no one can say I don't pay my way."

That was in 2005.

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

19 March 2012
"Capital City Tattoo'z"

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

19 March 2012
Tattoo parlor is another 'cash-cash' business.

Taocpa (talk|edits) said:

2012-03-19
200 posts and it's not even about Girl Scout cookies.

Tom

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

28 March 2012
discrete, discreet

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

28 March 2012
Merrill Lynch taught me a word I never found in Finney & Miller back in 1962-63: Accretion, or accrete.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

28 March 2012
Actual signs I have read:

This one on a United flight, many years ago, posted near the exit row seats: "If you are unable to read this sign, please ask flight attendant to change your seat assignment."

This one outside a deli where I picked up lunch today, printed on a cardboard box used to deliver rolls to the deli: "If you are not authorized to use this box, you will be prosecuted." (I do not have authorization to use it, but so far, no one has arrested me).

Taxaway (talk|edits) said:

29 March 2012
like

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

29 March 2012
Best warning/instruction ever: "Keep away from small children."

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

30 March 2012
IRS policies help fuel tax refund fraud, officials say.

IRS policies help fuel-tax refund fraud, officials say.

IRS policies help fuel tax-refund fraud, officials say.

Good illustration of how important a hyphen can be.

Szptax (talk|edits) said:

21 April 2012
While shoe shopping yesterday, I corrected the grammar of a perfect stranger in another aisle. They couldn't see me, and I wonder if they heard me. I just couldn't help myself and made the correction aloud instead of silently in my head.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

21 April 2012
Helps to get it all out there. Keeping it in is unhealthy. That is why we correct one another on TA.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

21 April 2012
A man (something Healy or Healey is his name) being interviewed on the radio yesterday. He is what I believe is known as a savant. He remembers every day of his life since he was 6 years old. (No idea why it starts at that age). He knows what happened, the weather, what he ate, etc., and, interestingly, what day of the week the date was. But his grammar was awful!

Harry Boscoe (talk|edits) said:

27 April 2012
If they were a "perfect" stranger, they wouldn't need correction.

Does anybody know if there's any distinction between "a perfect stranger," "a complete stranger," and I can't remember what the 3rd expression is...

MWPXYZ (talk|edits) said:

27 April 2012
total

Taxaway (talk|edits) said:

29 April 2012
(usually sports radio)

"there's no bigger fan of so-and-so than me, but...."

Right, so-and-so's spouse is not a bigger fan, his children, his family, YOU are the biggest fan of someone you haven't known his whole life! Just give your criticism without trying to justify or iron-clad it.

Taxaway (talk|edits) said:

29 April 2012
Another one:

"It's just my opinion."

No #@*&$. As if we can't distinguish between statements of fact and statements of opinion. As if saying that, means no one can disagree with it.

Corollary: "It's just my personal opinion."

Thanks, I thought it was just your impersonal opinion.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

29 April 2012
From a Tax Questions post "Heavy Truck record keeping". How many hyphens do we need, and where?

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

29 April 2012
Hyphens? I'll vote for *none*: "Heavy Truck recordkeeping"

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

30 April 2012
I'm fine with that, Spell, but the (forgive me) spell check feature in TA likes record-keeping, but highlights recordkeeping. Oh, and is there such a thing as heavy truck-record keeping, wherein it is the record, not the truck, that is heavy?

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

19 May 2012
Question for anyone, but mostly for Spell Czech: Is there a term, kinda like "mixed metaphor", for mixing languages. Example: "on contrare" instead of "au contraire".

Mufid (talk|edits) said:

19 May 2012
Harry

Back then:

The Tax Preparer:

  • Prepared the Tax Return, from data provided by the Taxpayer
  • Printed the Paper Tax Return, Client copy AND Governemt Filing copy
  • Gave the Taxpayer both copies, and
  • The Taxpayer signed and filed "His/Her/Their" tax return

NOW, the Tax Preparer, E-Files their tax returns

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

19 May 2012
"Franglais" went around for a while. But maybe that's narrower than what you're looking for.

...narrower than that for which you're looking. Not likely...

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

20 May 2012
reticent/reluctant. Lately, news reporters (readers, really) have latched on to "reticent", as in "Romney is reticent to name a VP candidate."

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

1 June 2012
Why do we say "I'll get it done before the summer is out" but also say "I'll get it done while the sun is out"?

What does it mean for something to be "pretty ugly"?

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

1 June 2012
Heard something very close to this on a morning radio news report about the John Edwards trial: "Sources say prosecutors are unlikely to attempt to try to retry Edwards again." Ouch.

Kyea (talk|edits) said:

4 June 2012
Padolin, Wouldn't that be like saying,"I don't want to even make an effort (attempt) to convince these guys (try) to go to the effort of retrying Edwards"?

I agree that is awkward but possible.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

4 June 2012
I agree that is awkward but possible. I guess so, but I think the reporter just meant that they are unlikely to retry him.

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

4 June 2012
I don't like using "pretty" but I find I do say it out of habit - I need to recruit a personal slapper for those occasions. (Slapper as in someone to slap me; not a loose, overly made-up, average looking female.)

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

4 June 2012
Never heard your "other" definition of slapper, but just looked it up and the one I found uses a bit stronger notion than "loose" and I do not want to pollute this TA site with the language it uses.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

16 June 2012
Just heard a radio commercial for one of these hawkers of allegedly guaranteed retirement investments, of this type Discussion:Retirement investment - scam, legit, or in between?. An alleged customer said "This investment allowed my wife and I to sleep better", or some equally asinine comment. Would a single guy have said, "This investment allowed I to sleep better"?

Reason I say alleged is some lawyer told me it protects me:-)

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

18 June 2012
Client's Merrill Lynch account shows he holds the PIMCO Unconstrained Tax Managed Fund.

Sounds more like a medical condition I'd hear from a gastroenterologist. Or the title of an old John Wayne movie.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

18 June 2012
There was a traffic tie-up on a major expressway this morning. TV traffic reporter said, "You can try abc street or either xyz road as alternatives."

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

18 June 2012
Unconstrained Tax Managed Fund. Too funny. I wonder if it is constrained by tax law.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

22 June 2012
Precise language, as we know, is pretty important in tax preparation and consultation. It can be even more important in criminal matters. I am watching a discussion of the George Zimmerman/Trayvon Martin murder case. One aspect is the 911 tape, in which the 911 operator, hearing that Z was following M, said, "We don't need you to do that." Did he mean exactly what he said, or did he mean "We need you not to do that"? One can be interpreted to mean it is not necessary for you to follow him, but it's OK if you do. The other means stop following him. Might be an issue in the trial.

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

22 June 2012
This is true: My friend was being taken into custody and I wasn't. [You don't need the back story, trust me.] One of the officers on the scene (the really young one, the one with no hair) told me sternly "You are free to go." I challenged somewhat obnoxiously the ambiguity in what he had said, and after he threatened to arrest me for disobeying a police officer he allowed me to leave, which was what he had said, wasn't it? Idiot with an attitude. Probably learned it all listening to older members of the police force.

But maybe I was out of line, taking literally what he had said, since I should have known knew what he meant to say. He probably thought he was being polite...


And, totally unrelated, I quit reading the online pseudo-scholarly article on how real estate taxes affect the value of property, when I got to where the author wrote "First, you need to understand that residential real estate values are based upon what it will cost an average consumer per month to own a home. This number is called P.I.T.I, which represents – principle, interest, taxes and insurance." I hope *everybody* sees why I stopped reading. Actually the *two* reasons I stopped reading...

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

22 June 2012
He probably thought he was being polite... He assumed you wanted to go. Probably learned it all listening to older members of the police force. More likely on TV cop shows.

One reason - the misspelling of "principal". Second reason - you fell asleep? Or he is clearly no expert?

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

28 June 2012
If I put food that has never been cold before into that appliance in the kitchen that will make it cold, why am I refrigerating it? Why not frigerating?

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

29 June 2012
I forget who asked recently, but the answer to other words (besides facetiously) that do the vowels in order, plus y, are abstemiously and abstentiously. There may also be others.

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

19 July 2012
I'm not feeling it.

Just sayin'.

Anywho/Anyhoo.

Ginormous.

All in one morning - thanks.

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

20 July 2012
Just in...

Re-continuing.

Belle (talk|edits) said:

July 20, 2012
Another new one (to me...)

re-purposing

Harry Boscoe (talk|edits) said:

21 July 2012
This, overheard just yesterday: "I feel I must reiterate once again..." but I missed the rest of what he was saying as I choked back the guffaws.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

21 July 2012
"I feel I must reiterate once again..." Ghost of Yogi Berra!

Szptax (talk|edits) said:

24 July 2012
I really like the show NCIS, but I must audibly correct their repeated mistaken use of "who" where "whom" is grammatically correct. Does no-one use "whom" anymore?

Harry Boscoe (talk|edits) said:

26 July 2012
"Does no one use "whom" anymore?"

The Washington Post has started using it again recently, and uses it frequently. Both correctly and incorrectly.

"It was reported that the perp, whom the police said had been wearing a puce tutu, sautéed over a dumpster and escaped."

Szptax (talk|edits) said:

27 July 2012
I went to a CPE class today. In the PowerPoint presentation the presenter mistakenly and repeatedly used "then" when he should have used "than".

Harry Boscoe (talk|edits) said:

12 August 2012
This, from a website that's encouraging us to take better care of ourselves by monitoring our blood chemistry: "The importance of a blood sugar monitor cannot be underemphasized for controlling this disease."

This is just a first cousin of the "I could care less" bunch, isn't it?

Not a day doesn't go by that I don't think about not drinking...

There's refrigpbr'erator.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

12 August 2012
Hmmmm.... Two identical posts by two TA contributors. What are we to make of this?

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

12 August 2012
Hmmmm.... Plagiarism?

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

12 August 2012
Hmmmm.... Plagiarism, but retracted?

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

12 August 2012
My point in this post is arithmetic, not vocabulary, but I do not want to start a new political discussion about voter ID. Here is an article http://www.philly.com/philly/news/politics/presidential/20120811_Investigation__election_day_fraud_virtually_nonexistent.html that contains these sentences: "The analysis of 2,068 reported fraud cases by News21, a Carnegie-Knight investigative reporting project, found 10 cases of alleged in-person voter impersonation since 2000.

With 146 million registered voters in the United States, those represent about one for every 15 million prospective voters."

I am too tired to try it right now, but can anyone who reads this help me with the arithmetic that converted 10 (alleged) in-person frauds out of over 2000 reported frauds into 1 per 15,000,000?

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

12 August 2012
Hmmmm.... Plagiarism, but retracted? Tricky. Now what are readers to think about the absence of any visible basis for my question, and the presence of two posts that I did not post.

Harry Boscoe (talk|edits) said:

12 August 2012
146,000,000 [registered voters] divided by ten [cases of alleged impersonation] approximates one per 15,000,000. Have a cup of coffee.

Harry Boscoe (talk|edits) said:

12 August 2012
Readers who *think* shouldn't be reading this. A visible basis for a question is a dubious luxury. Take what you can get, give what you have to.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

12 August 2012
Harry, the ten cases were out of 2068 reported frauds. Could there have been a bunch of frauds not reported? Also, why only focus on in-person frauds? Votes cast by absentee ballot are much more susceptible to fraud. Because of the new ID rules, i am now helping my wife go through hoops to obtain an absentee ballot. She no longer can drive or sign her name, her driver's license has expired, as has her passport, etc.

Having said that, you are right - need more coffee. I read the article too quickly and thought it said there were 10 alleged frauds out of 2000 votes cast.

BTW, did you receive the PBR comic strip that I sent a while ago?

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

12 August 2012
Readers who *think* shouldn't be reading this. True that. Lost my head. Off to the car show - no thinking needed there.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

13 August 2012
A news article about a chimp that escaped (and was recaptured) has this sentence: The chimp was turned over to an animal entertainer for safekeeping before going to a sanctuary in Oregon. Is the "animal entertainer" (a) a human being who uses animals to entertain; (b) a human being who entertains animals; or (c) an animal who entertains chimps as a means of safekeeping?

Harry Boscoe (talk|edits) said:

13 August 2012
Sounds like the "heavy truck record keeping" rule might apply here.

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

14 August 2012
"...revert back...."

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

21 August 2012
A letter to the editor, praising the choice of Paul Ryan, had this confusing headline: Ryan has left in a panic.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

1 September 2012
Was just reminded by a crossword puzzle clue that the word "left" can have opposite meanings - remaining and departed. "Who's left?"

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

8 September 2012
Is "deacquisition" a word? I haven't checked, and maybe it is, but in this article http://www.philly.com/philly/news/20120908_St__Joseph_s_buying_cardinal_s_mansion_for__10M.html regarding the sale of a mansion by the Catholic church, wouldn't "sale" or "disposition" have been a better choice and less contrived? Here is the sentence :"In recent years, however, deacquisition of these properties has been the trend." To me, deacquisition implies cancelling/nullifying an acquisition, as distinguished from selling.

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

26 October 2012
Hanging from my mailbox this morning:


this was a link to a jpg, which has apparently since been deleted. It was labelled Reflect-o-Lite


Didn't even try.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

26 October 2012
Didn't even try. Ah, c'mon. Show us all the errors.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

26 October 2012
A box of dog treats that I have is labeled "Small Dog Training Treats". Should it be Small-Dog Training Treats? Or Small Dog-Training Treats? Or even Small-Dog-Training-Treats? Or, better yet, who cares?

MP-JD-LLM (talk|edits) said:

27 October 2012
“When I use a word,” Humpty Dumpty said, in rather a scornful tone, “it means just what I choose it to mean — neither more nor less ...

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

5 November 2012
Applying a "broad" interpretation of the title of this discussion, I am adding "Grammar" as an allowable piece of the thread. This headline The Syrian Rebels New Covert-Ops Campaign. appeared in a September issue of Newsweek. Shouldn't Rebels be Rebels' to indicate the possessive? Not exactly a momentous point, I know, but I am curious.

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

8 November 2012
Has anyone else encountered the "superfluous both"?

As in "Larry and Jim both agreed to meet at eleven."

They agreed to meet. That's it. Both has nothing to do with their agreement. Its use in that context is superfluous. There are better examples, but this is the one in my forebrain right now.

Unless they *each* agreed to meet, separately, and probably with an unnamed third person, at eleven. Which is a whole 'nuther thing...

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

8 November 2012
Sure, Lenny, just add any topic that seems to fit in here. Mistranslations of Latin phrases. Rhymes that don't rhyme. Is punctuation a sub-category of grammar, or is it a category unto itself? I thought Newsweek stopped paying its paper bill...

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

8 November 2012
Spell, glad to see you back on this topic.

Don't remember any mistranslations of Latin phrases.

I say sub-category.

Here are two more recent ones:

Joe Biden said something along these lines (may not be exact quote, but close enough) "There has never been a time - not one day - that I have been proud to be Vice President to President Obama." Needed a "not" in there.

Recent radio commercial by a talking head, advertising New Balance sneakers: "I love my New Balance sneakers, and you will too."

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

9 November 2012
Here's my conflation of Sandy, the storm, and words, the topic of this thread:

Is it time yet to reconsider the use of "impact" as a verb? My grandmother would cringe when we used it incorrectly. But my grandmother is gone.

Has "impact" become accepted when it's used as a verb?

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

9 November 2012
Click here for the chorus chiming in - a couple of years ago - on "impact" used as a verb.

And if you spend enough time there to get to the observation about the wasted "of" in the expression "...off of the road..." the answer to the rhetorical question asked there is "To make up for the "of" missing from thousands of "...couple [plural noun].""

You know what I'm referring to, and you know how difficult it is to write about writing when your free computer at the library is going to time out in a couple [of] seconds.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

9 November 2012
Once I had a tooth that the dentist said was impacted. How could it get impacted if someone or something did not impact it?

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

9 November 2012
Transitive verb, passive voice, becomes adjectival participle, as in "impacted tooth".

Should my period go inside my quotation mark, above? There's never not a question, is there not?

MP-JD-LLM (talk|edits) said:

10 November 2012
My pet peeve. I just saw a tennis instruction video which stated, "The player should keep their head down." "Player" is clearly singular, and "their" is clearly plural possessive pronoun. This is what happens when grammar collides with political correctness.

Or, how about failure to use the subjunctive, such as, "I wouldn't say such things if I was you?" Urg!

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

10 November 2012
Would that it was me were I.

How's this grab you? "I appreciate you your being on my show."

So dangle that participle! Or gerund.

No, there sure surely isn't aren't ain't.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

11 November 2012
From an openly gay female candidate who won: "A lot of glass ceilings were smashed last Tuesday, and I was one of them."

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

12 November 2012
"A lot of glass ceilings were smashed last Tuesday, and I was one of them."

Brilliant!

Why was my *Reflect-O-Lite.jpg* deleted?

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

12 November 2012
After being invited to a *breastaurant* today and attempting to clarify this nauseating word, I quickly learned that I am a "weirdo hermit" who doesn't get out much (for which I can only assume is code for mingling with the lower class) as this term is boringly common. "Titties and sammiches" it is then - although I must confess, when I think of *titties* and *sammiches* I don't appropriately think of food.

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

14 November 2012
Quoted from something online, I don't care what it came from, it's just a hoot:

The Kelleys invited then-Florida Gov. Charlie Crist to their home, but he never accepted. Instead, he had dinner with the Kelleys at a steakhouse in Tampa with Petraeus. "Lovely people. I remember I had a nice dinner with she and her husband and the general and his wife," Crist said.

I just want to know if the reporter who chose to use this quote from Governor Crist did so to mock his faulty grammar, or if the reporter is just as unaware, faux, lax, illiterate, whatever, as the governor is.

Vote early, vote often.

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

14 November 2012
And should he have been identified in the article as Florida ex-Gov. Charlie Crist?

Which is ex-, Florida or Gov.? Clearly, the governor is ex-, not Florida. Unless Florida has been given back to the Spaniards...

Harry Boscoe (talk|edits) said:

26 November 2012
Is "each and every" a redundancy?

A little verbal flourish for emphasis, sure, but does it *mean* anything or is it just a little verbal flourish?

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

26 November 2012
It's a pleonasm. An annoying one.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

26 November 2012
http://idioms.yourdictionary.com/each-and-every-one Dunno if it is a redundancy, but apparently it's an idiom.

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

27 November 2012
According to naive set theory, any definable collection is a set. Let R be the set of all sets that are not members of themselves. If R qualifies as a member of itself, it would contradict its own definition as a set containing all sets that are not members of themselves. On the other hand, if such a set is not a member of itself, it would qualify as a member of itself by the same definition. This contradiction is Russell's paradox.

For this reason, I would say that each and every may not be redundant, but I'm not sure, and I don't want to open a Pandora's box so near to the holiday. I will say that if you concentrate too much on each, you tend to forget every----and you can't do that.

Since I don't want to go crazy like Georg Cantor and Kurt Godel did, I'll leave off here. Let the lives of these two men be a lesson to each and every one of you. It didn't faze Russell, he had the right attitude and continued to pursue his study of womanhood instead of logic.

Russell's paradox combined with the work of the genius Gödel had some dramatic consequences for mathematics. Alan Turing probably belongs in this group as well. NASA keeps a team at their facility in VA that just works on such because they are concerned about the stability of systems on long missions. Good video on where we are today, post Godel. Lecture at University of Sydney. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i2KP1vWkQ6Y&feature=relmfu

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

27 November 2012
If and only if. If I had the slightest idea about what CrowJD posted, I'd be an expert in what? Answer only if you are sure.

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

27 November 2012
I do have a vocabulary question. Is it ok to use the early two thousands as a way to refer to the beginning years of the 21st century? It does not sound right to my ears. However, we said...the early nineteen hundreds, eighteen hundreds etc.

I agree with Tennessee Williams that all good prose should be poetry, and the early two thousands doesn't sound right to me.

You grammarians and vocabulary gentlemen and ladies (aka nuts and fanatics) are made to order for the higher branches of mathematics and logic. "The wheels of the gods grind slowly, but they grind exceedingly fine." That saying needs to be on a T-shirt for the grammar and vocabulary scholars around here, and put in the pile over with my Christmas gift ideas.  :)

P.S. I was going to suggest the series Dangerous Knowledge. It appears that the BBC series Dangerous Knowledge, which started with the life of mathematician Georg Cantor, then covered Ludwig Boltzmann, Kurt Gödel and Alan Turing, has been removed from youtube, but I found it at TopDocumentaryFilms.com. Woops. You can't play it at Documentary films either so I guess they had sourced it through youtube. Oh well, hopefully they will put it back on in the future.

The lecture I posted above on Gödel from Univ. of Sydney is also good, but less complete.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

27 November 2012
I agree with Tennessee Williams that all good prose should be poetry, and the early two thousands doesn't sound right to me. Wasn't that Tennessee Ernie Ford?

Poetic Patrick, Pennsylvania purveyor of perfect pre-owned Plymouths, Pontiacs, and Porsches, promotes possible purchasers as follows. "Each and every" time he refers to those years, but "if and only if" he remembers, he states, "We have huge discounts on pre-owned vehicles produced in the erstwhile nascent, primal decade of the two score centuries since the common era." He tends to be very P.C.

PollyAdler (talk|edits) said:

27 November 2012
lol. I hope that Professor Von Czech is ramping up production on the proposed T-shirt for the vocabulary and grammar board.

"The wheels of the gods grind slowly, but they grind exceedingly fine."

That is Le Czech in a nutshell.

Let me warn all of you on this board, if you don't want to end up like Jesse Jackson, Jr., get out while you can.

I have been ground to powder under the weight of Von Czech's grammar mill so many times, I have forgotten whether it's I before E, except after P, or E before I, except in PIE. I am now past the help of the Mayo Clinic altogether. I am shipwrecked.

In short, he changed me from the virile, turgid writer that I once was, into the wilted castrato hack that I've now become.

Harry Boscoe (talk|edits) said:

27 November 2012
"Canadian researchers say there are now 85 drugs that may interact with grapefruit."

I *think* that what the Canadian researchers would have wanted to be said to have said would be "Canadian researchers now say there are now 85 drugs that may interact with grapefruit."

Just another place where an astute copy editor would have earned his meager pittance.

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

27 November 2012
Harry, you have come to the right place. We do not treat reality in a joking manner around here.

Language is not merely a way of looking at the world, it is being itself. The China man is not the same being as the English man, and so on. (Well, I guess if the China man speaketh English, he does get a second hand flavor the English man's being. This would need further study. I don't want it said of me that I spake too hastily.)

If a man's language is messed up, his very being is out of joint and needs adjustment. The greatest threat to the world today is not the Swine Flu, rather it is sloppiness in the proper use of language which is the greatest crime against humanity there is. It strikes at what it is to be (esse).

Welcome to Professor Von Spell Czech's Linguistic Shoppe of Chiropractic, where you can get your groove on, and get a life (literally) at the same time.

Unfortunately, the Professor is not in at the moment, but you can bet that he's out in the world somewhere (we don't know where) correcting the grammar of some unfortunate slob so that he goes home, not merely as a more educated man, but as a new man. A new being.

Gazoo (talk|edits) said:

27 November 2012
Crow, I take it that Von Czech was not a fan of the Eubonics movement?

I know that about 20 years ago, the people of Earth sent the people of Mars two truckloads of (heavily) used Eubonics books (by spacecraft) that were presumably no longer needed on earth. Now all us Martians speak Eubonics. Yo.

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

27 November 2012
First, let me say to you my man: Yo back to 'yo Yo.

Quote: "Crow, I take it that Von Czech was not a fan of the Eubonics movement?"

<ahem> Impertinent Martian. I think that would be a safe bet to make. Now go on wit-cha bad sef, and doan be eatin' no chickun off the bone now. K K?

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

27 November 2012
Martin Amis is known to take his love of the English language and abhorrence for the cliche to almost "parodic lengths." When introduced to George Orwell's 1984 and reached “ruggedly handsome features” on the first page he refused to go any further into the book. “The man can’t write worth a damn.”

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

27 November 2012
George Orwell's 1984

Yes, but Orwell's sales were better. If he had written a non-fiction book of philosophy or sociology, it would have gathered dust on a shelf somewhere. Reasoning thusly, he writes a book of fiction and it gets read. So it was a non-fiction book, thinly and perhaps poorly worked up into fiction.

I am a huge proponent of cliche and stereotype (I am sure no one is surprised by my admission. lol). I'm still furious that they neutered the old General in the Beetle Bailey comic strip. They sanitized his comments (and looks) regarding the ladies on base.

Imagine a young writer who has taken into account the longevity of his forebears, and has found them wanting. He may say to himself----Awright, on with the stereotypes and the cliché, then. O'ive got to get this down on paper before the curtain comes down on tau 'o me.  :)

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

28 November 2012
In my opinion and I personally, or worse, in my opinion, I personally...

I know they're socially acceptable but here is my problem: I don't care. Stop it!

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

28 November 2012
"We are currently experiencing a higher than normal call volume..."

Bloody hell!

Captcook (talk|edits) said:

28 November 2012
In my opinion...

I think this is a generally useless phrase unless juxtaposed against the giving of facts. If you aren't providing facts, then whatever else you say IS your opinion.

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

29 November 2012
Time to bring back Mr. Arbutthnot, the Cliche Expert:

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/bios/frank_sullivan/search?contributorName=Frank+Sullivan

This Frank Sullivan is not the Frank Sullivan, Red Sox & Phillies pitcher of the mid-50s to mid-60s (loser of the 1955 All Star Game, giving up a home run to Stan the Man in extra innings) whose immortal quote I have always tried to master:

"I am in the twilight of a mediocre career."

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

29 November 2012
"In my opinion, the tax return looks ok." However, there is a smudge on page 3.

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

29 November 2012
The tax return looks OK

But for a smudge on Schedule A

So my opinion on this matter

If you’ll stop your incessant chatter

Is to ignore it and get on with your day


Better out than in, as they say.

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

29 November 2012
Is it just me, or does this particular page load slowly?

I was goind to say, 'load slow' or better yet, 'lode slow'

So much bandwidth, so little sense.

Trillium (talk|edits) said:

29 November 2012
D&T, it's probably not just you. If you try to edit this page, you get a note saying, "This page is 86 kilobytes long; some browsers may have problems editing pages approaching or longer than 32kb." IOW, it's really, really, long! Maybe time for a new, "part 2," discussion?

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

29 November 2012
Just scrolling to the latest post takes an hour or two:-)

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

29 November 2012
And there is a smudge about 26.1kbs into it.

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

29 November 2012
"Eubonics"?????? Maybe that is the Atlanta version? How about Ebonics?

http://joel.net/EBONICS/Translator

Captcook (talk|edits) said:

30 November 2012
How about www.gizoogle.net?

Here's my wife's business as translated by 'gizoogle': http://www.gizoogle.net/index.php?search=www.goodwinds.com&se=Gizoogle+Dis+Shiznit

The death of vocabulary, indeed.

Gazoo (talk|edits) said:

30 November 2012
Can this be true?

Friendly is one of the few English worlds that ends in "ly" but is not an adverb. It's an adjective. The adverbial form is "friendlyly". As in---I walked the dog friendlyly last night. (i.e. I acted in a friendly manner when I walked the dog).

I learned of this today in another context and I'm sold on it; and now I've added another word to my vocabulary, "friendlyly".

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

30 November 2012
I learned of this today in another context Wait, Gazoo, first we need to understand the base context. Then, we might (or not) be curious about the other context.

Gazoo (talk|edits) said:

30 November 2012
first we need to understand the base context

I bought an option on a 14 year old Russian girl to be my wife when she turns 21 (just in case something happens to my dear wife). I am hedging my bets, as they say up there on Wall Street. Yes, I am one of those fat American men that runs over to Russia and buys a wife when something goes wrong at home. In preparation for exercising my option one day, I'm taking Russian language lessons and my Russian teacher pointed out to me this English anomaly.

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

30 November 2012
Maybe this does not form part of the bastardization of our vocabulary, but the shortening of names to two simple words, the first usually being a letter, has to stop at some point: J-Lo, A-Rod, K-Rod, K-Fed (Ms. Spears' husband), A. (or B, C, D, E, F......Z) Jax for anyone with the surname Jackson.

T/A is one place this has not happened yet: L-Pod, Cee-Cook, H-Bos, P-Ad,K-5. Crow has already done same with J-Crow, but G-zoo sounds like a sneeze, and no one wants to mess with Fa-Mac.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

30 November 2012
DTax, stop being so fussy. I'm pretty sure K5 has been used numerous times on TA. It has to roll trippingly off the tongue or it won't catch on. DTax works. K5 too. Not so sure about the rest. Although BLine sounds pretty good. So does SCheck.

Taocpa (talk|edits) said:

2012-11-30
To think I was chastised for using "myself" or "upcoming" in middle school. I feel safe to assume, based on the daily scribblings I suffer through that kids today are getting off lightly.
*Healthwise* and *TV Personality* would have gotten me expelled.

Edit: Seems I'm logged in as Taocpa. This is UKbones

Taocpa (talk|edits) said:

2012-11-30
Maybe I should take advantage of this.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

30 November 2012
Dear UK, or Tom, whoever you are: http://esl.about.com/od/grammarintermediate/p/tip180.htm

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

30 November 2012
We could get really carried away with this. (from the 3rd post). Ya think??

Gazoo (talk|edits) said:

30 November 2012
It's not all bad. In some ways, the young people today are writing more than ever before. And of course, they invent ingenious short hand ways of getting their ideas across with a limited number of key strokes.

The dedication among the young is impressive and it's a preacher's dream come true. With their little fingers and hands so busy typing, there is little opportunity for the hanky panky of the old fashion variety.

....

Crow has already done same with J-Crow, but G-zoo sounds like a sneeze, and no one wants to mess with Fa-Mac.

You have to do this today to maintain your street cred. down in the hood.

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

30 November 2012
When in Rome, L-Pod...

Makbo (talk|edits) said:

30 November 2012
"I do have a vocabulary question. Is it ok to use the early two thousands as a way to refer to the beginning years of the 21st century? It does not sound right to my ears. However, we said...the early nineteen hundreds, eighteen hundreds etc. "

Why deviate from the existing pattern? "Back in the early twenty hundreds...". It is still grating to hear commercial announcers wasting an extra syllable with "two thousand twelve" when they could be saying "twenty twelve". I've been gently trying to steer people that way in the tax office ever since I started back in twenty-oh-five.

Cable channel VH1 has come up with their approach, which I don't care for too much:

"VH1 brings you the next big hit in their hugely popular "I Love The" series [I Love the 80's, I Love the 90's, etc]: "I Love The New Millennium." In fact, we love the 2000's so much we couldn't even wait for them to end. "

It should be, "I Love the Aughts". See Merriam-Webster:

Definition of AUGHT [...] 3. plural : the first decade of a century

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

30 November 2012
ever since I started back in twenty-oh-five. twenty-oh-five, 4 syllables. two thousand twelve, 4 syllables.

Seriously, I like the "aught" approach, and I will start using it. My wife will assume I am nuts. My kids will assume I am old.

Makbo (talk|edits) said:

30 November 2012
two thousand twelve, 4 syllables

twenty twelve, 3 syllables

It was unfortunate that "two thousand" and "twenty-oh" had the same number of syllables, otherwise the anomaly may never have happened. No one says "nineteen hundred ninety-nine", because it's easier to just say "nineteen ninety-nine". (Well, OK, Paul McCartney did write a song "Nineteen Hundred and Eighty-Five", but that was just to fill out the poetic meter). Why folks ever started saying "two thousand" was probably because of that old movie "2001 A Space Odyssey". It was stronger influence (because of the shorter elapsed time) than the old Zager and Evans song "In the Year 2525", where obviously no one would say "In the Year two thousand five hundred twenty five".

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

30 November 2012
Some of us old fartsfolks write out checks "Two-thousand one-hundred eighty-seven". Although that is rare, because we rarely have that much in the account.

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

30 November 2012
This from my monologue, "Tennyson, Anyone" written in November 2000, referring to the Wall Street Journal saying that David Boies parachuted in:

"Ah, but 'parachuting in' is just so turn of century. Back when men actually did enter battle by parachute, they simply jumped, using their parachute. Clever writers hadn't managed to turn a noun into a verb yet. They had not prioritized their priorities.

        It was probably the cigarettes hanging from their lips, and the glasses of scotch next to their Underwoods that kept wordsmiths from making nouns into verbs. On a word processor, 'parachuting in' is an effortless type, but when pounding the old manual portable, 'jump' takes less sweat and has less chance of needing correction."

This was written before T/A was a gleam in anyone's eye, and SC's talent was hidden under a bush.

http://www.writing.com/main/view_item/item_id/257470-TENNYSON-ANYONE

Gazoo (talk|edits) said:

30 November 2012
I'm a big fan of Raymond Chandler. I've read his books so many times I can tell when the author himself starts to get loaded as he writes. It took a lot of hooch to get him through some of his later works.

His Gin Gimlet recipe still sets the standard:... "a real gimlet is half gin and half Rose's lime juice and nothing else" (Terry Lennox in Raymond Chandler's The Long Goodbye).

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

30 November 2012
Terry Lennox? You mean Jim Bouton? Elliott Gould as Marlow, for cripes sake....

I love the story of Chandler writing the screen play for Double Indemnity, and James Cain's reaction, realizing the ending Chandler gave it was so much better than his. Then there was Chandler being called in by Faulkner and Brackett to figure out who shot Owen Taylor. Hawks version is great, but it is not the book. Let Carmen take the rap for herself without the help of Eddie Mars.

Gazoo (talk|edits) said:

30 November 2012
Chandler really knew how to pull you into his world. I didn't even know Chandler existed until I was in my middle age, and it was a huge treat for me when I first read one of his books, really by accident (I didn't go into the bookstore looking for Chandler).

For anyone interested, here is a great and convenient anthology of some of his work. http://www.amazon.com/Raymond-Chandler-Stories-Farewell-Library/dp/1883011078

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

1 December 2012
I think there are a significant number of TA readers who have no idea what this refers to: next to their Underwoods (or, to what this refers).

I once thought I had made it big into the electronic age when I bought a used IBM Selectric (from my employer) that I would use at home.

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

1 December 2012
Underwood is more phonetic than Smith-Corona. I had a Royal that when you slammed a key, it would jump.

Gazoo: Do read The Glass Key by Hammett, the definitive detective novel. The film Miller's Crossing is lightly based on it.

And you might enjoy this article I wrote about James Cain and the times: http://www.writing.com/main/books/entry_id/243891

Makbo (talk|edits) said:

1 December 2012
"Some of us old fartsfolks write out checks "Two-thousand one-hundred eighty-seven". Although that is rare, because we rarely have that much in the account. "

Nowadays you could probably write "Twenty-one eighty-seven and zero cents" with impunity, as no human or machine is going to (try to) read the spelled-out words you wrote. I still pay some bills by paper check in support of the USPS (while also waiting for the vendors to pay me for doing their keypunching for them via online payments), so I'm going to try this going forward, I'll report back if my checks are rejected.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

1 December 2012
I still pay some bills by paper check Me too, but very few.

CrowJD (talk|edits) said:

1 December 2012
Gazoo: Do read The Glass Key by Hammett, the definitive detective novel. The film Miller's Crossing is lightly based on it.

And you might enjoy this article I wrote about James Cain and the times: http://www.writing.com/main/books/entry_id/243891


David, I probably have read The Glass Key sometime in my past. Unfortunately, I'm very sloppy with my books. I don't know what I've read. I give them away, lose them, use them as drink coasters and everything else. Plus the dear saint I live with organizes an occasional "book burning" to get rid of the extras. Salvation Army told her not to bring any more of my books up to the troops since they depressed the customers.

Cain I am not as familiar with but I have heard his name. Thanks for the link to your article. (I think I will have to register to read your article, but that's no problem.)

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

1 December 2012
Not *too* happy.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

3 December 2012
Spell, your input is needed to check my answer in this Discussion:Form 8854 Part IV question

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

8 December 2012
From The Washington Post: "He found out he would have to make due with less..." Yeah, it's *only* a movie review, and the spell-checker won't flag it, but where I come from it's a glaring error and it disrupts the reader's focus and shows that the writer didn't have a copy editor. What have we become?

I have forgotten already the name of the movie that was being reviewed...

Check out "Make due" at the Urban Dictionary.

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

10 December 2012
On sales letters:

Would it be too risky to write in proper English with integrity and without pretentious diction? Has anyone here dared to try it?

My annoyances for the day are: "the fact that", "with regards to", "facilitate" and "our objective" - all conveniently packaged in one letter for my reading pleasure. I'm sending the letter back with notes.

Captcook (talk|edits) said:

10 December 2012
UK, I have a fellow who manages rentals for my mom and aunt that does a horrible job of writing his letters. They are filled with examples of what you describe. I'm almost compelled to send one back marked up with red ink, but, then, I'd have one fewer reason to complain about his business practices and I rather like to do so.

He also doesn't sign these letters, which just annoys the hell out of me.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

11 December 2012
"utilize", where "use" would do just fine. Just another example.

Harry Boscoe (talk|edits) said:

11 December 2012
"...at that point in time."

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

11 December 2012
Just saw the word "cognized" in a tax case, referring to a gain or loss. We usually say "recognized". Did the court make a typo, or is "cognized" correct? (Please don't make me find the case; but I can if need be).

Anarchrist (talk|edits) said:

11 December 2012
http://lmgtfy.com/?q=cognized

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

11 December 2012
Thanks, Anarchrist. Based on the def'n., I'd say the tax opinion has a typo.

Captcook (talk|edits) said:

11 December 2012
Maybe it was the first time it had been "cognized"? Later when they'd "cognized" again, they properly wrote RE-cognized(?). No?

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

11 December 2012
Exactly. I bought a warm 6-pack, and I frigerated it. Then my power failed, and I had to refrigerate it.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

12 December 2012
Here are exact quotes from two separate AP items in today's paper. Do we blame the writers or the editors?

THe first one is about Fidelity's decision to reduce some mutual-fund fees: "The moves affect funds holding about $100 billion in assets, out of about $1.6 billion the Boston company manages overall."

Next, explaining the LIBOR rate fraud, says: "The rate indirectly affects the cost of loans that people pay when they take out loans." Where do I start? Do they think we do not know the meaning of the word "interest"? And do they think we need to be told that said interest is a cost when we "take out" loans, i.e., we don't have that cost if we don't borrow? Actually, even putting that point aside, they manage to confuse by implying/stating that the cost (interest) is paid when the loan is closed, as opposed to over time.

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

13 December 2012
Transportation and expiration. Good writing and speaking lessons:

1. Never use a long word where a short one will do.

2. Have I said anything that is avoidably ugly?

I got it for free (or worse for cheap). It is what it is!

African Americanisms are both dreadful and hilarious: "...like a motherf*cker." "I ran like a motherf*cker.", "I was cleaning my house like a motherf*cker."

Edit: The lessons are not mine. I must credit Orwell or Zinsser (I can't remember which).

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

14 December 2012
"Two-time"

Double?

"Three-time"

Triple?

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

29 January 2013
IRS Tax Tip 2013-02

Ten Things to Know about Free Volunteer Tax Help

4. The VITA and TCE programs provide free electronic filing. An e-filed tax return means an accurate return.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

29 January 2013
Ukbones, I take your point. But look....

From dictionary.com: definition of accurate 1. free from error or defect; consistent with a standard, rule, or model; precise; exact. 2. careful or meticulous: an accurate typist.

Which one do you think VITA and TCE mean?

Here is part of an H&R Block ad: "Accurate Calculations Guarantee: We guarantee accurate calculations or we'll reimburse resulting IRS penalties and interest charges (limits apply)."

They explain in detail what they mean, and it is complicated (and limited).

Ukbones (talk|edits) said:

29 January 2013
A tweak in the language might make it more tenable.

Podolin (talk|edits) said:

19 February 2013
Too hard for me to resist this one. A radio talk-show host, upset that a caller would not stay on topic, said, "It's just so exacerbating!" Yes, he meant exasperating, but I'm not sure he knew the difference.

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