Discussion:Airline Attendants

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Discussion Forum Index --> Basic Tax Questions --> Airline Attendants


Discussion Forum Index --> Tax Questions --> Airline Attendants

Bbla (talk|edits) said:

6 April 2014
I have an Airline Attendant client who claims that her job allows tax deductions for (1.) Grooming, including hairdressing, hair and skin care products, nails. (2.) Sunglasses. (3.) Black Slacks, blouses, shoes.

She tells me other airline employees have advised that these deductions are OK. The only publication that I could find that specifically mentions some of these items is the Australian Gov't/Taxation Office publication "Information on income tax matters for flight attendants." Skin moisturisers and hair conditioners used to combat the dehydration effects of pressurization and lack of humidity in an aircraft cabin are deductible. No mention of Nails. Sunglasses are deductible if you work on the tarmac at an airfield servicing, refueling or loading aircraft. The publication also states under Compulsory Uniforms that you may be able to claim a deduction for shoes, stocks and stockings where they are an essential part of a distinctive compulsory uniform, the characteristics of which - color, style, type - are specified in your employer's uniform policy. IRS Publication 529 does not go into this much detail; however, the IRS Pub does state that Wristwatches are not deductible. Has anyone been audited that has claimed deductions for these types of expenses?

Marcilio (talk|edits) said:

6 April 2014
Robert C. & Martha J. Fryer vs. Commissioner, TCM 1974-26 ... Many employers, expressly or otherwise, establish standards to which their employees are expected to conform. Men are to be clean shaven and are often required to wear suits, ties, and clean shirts, and women are expected to be dressed attractively [sexist statement]. To conform to these requirements, employees must make expenditures which would not be required if they were at home or not on the job. Nevertheless, such expenditures for general personal grooming are inherently personal in nature and cannot be considered as business expenses.

Hairdressing is not deductible. I deduct skin moisturizers and hair conditioners for the reason stated, but have not gone through audit on that. The clothing that you mentioned sounds like part of the uniform, but may be questionable if they are suitable for everyday use.

Ckenefick (talk|edits) said:

6 April 2014
Have you seen that discussion about a Hair Piece...wherein many of these topics were covered, from haircuts of servicemen, to clothing, to makeup, to...Hair Pieces...?

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

6 April 2014
If this kind of stuff were really deductible, I would certainly expect the airline industry to be all over it, with publications and announcements and authoritative references and the like, all stating the terms and conditions that IRS would apply in deciding the deductibility of this stuff. As much as I don't like "negative inference" I would insist that the absence of the industry's trumpeting the deductibility of black slacks and stockings, for example, is an indication, loud and clear, that this stuff - the cost of this stuff - is *not* deductible. Expect to lose this one on audit.

Tell the truth, Marcilio: You don't call it "skin moisturizers and hair conditioners" when you deduct it on your clients' tax returns, do you?

Nilodop (talk|edits) said:

6 April 2014
OP says "Airline Attendants". I'd separate stewards and stewardesses, as politically incorrect as that may be. I definitely insist on stewardesses being clean-shaven, and my personal proclivities do not include stewards who wear stockings. Maybe pantyhose. Uh oh, am I in big trouble for some sort of violation now?

Spell Czech (talk|edits) said:

6 April 2014
"...clean-shaven." Yeah, Lenny, me too, but does that make her razor a tax deduction?

Kevinh5 (talk|edits) said:

6 April 2014
Occam's razor was a deduction.

Nilodop (talk|edits) said:

6 April 2014
but does that make her razor a tax deduction? Of course not. I was trying to be funny. As usual, I failed. Did you hear the one about ...

Nilodop (talk|edits) said:

6 April 2014
But truth be told, I do deduct my CPA t-shirt, because I only wear it on days when I see clients.

Ckenefick (talk|edits) said:

6 April 2014
I agree with Spell's analysis: If the industry itself isn't promoting and publicizing these types of deductions, then they're not deductible.

I love these flight attendant tax returns...80 expense categories that add up to $5k before the 2-percent floor.

Maybe someone can find a checklist on the web, as posted by some FA expert accountant, that can be linked herein...then Spellczech could check the checklist over....and we could too.

Bbla (talk|edits) said:

6 April 2014
The website EZPerDiem.com has a list of over 100 items the site wants the attendant to consider. The site does state that socks, underwear, haircuts and wristwatches are not deductible. The site also states that just because an item is on the list does not necessarily mean it is deductible. So why show it on the list?

Example: Uniform Purchase Expenses; Belt, Blouse, Boots, Coat, Dress, Epaulets, Gloves, Hat, Jacket, Pants, Scarf, Serving Garment, Shirts, Shoes, Skirt, Wings, Other? No wonder the Airline Attendants think that all these expenses are deductible. My client did say she purchased her undergarments at Victoria Secret, I responded that even if you bought then at JCP, they are not deductible. She also has told me that I am always saying no. Oh Well

Ckenefick (talk|edits) said:

7 April 2014
She also has told me that I am always saying no.

You should have said, "No I'm not."

The website EZPerDiem.com has a list of over 100 items

I was pretty damn close, I said "80."

So why show it on the list?

My point exactly in encouraging someone to find one of these lists...they're always loaded with a bunch of b.s.

Death&Taxes (talk|edits) said:

7 April 2014
And these lists are usually prefaced with a statement, "If your tax guy isn't familiar with these, subscribe to Loopholes and Liars for only $59.95 for one year."

Globalexpress (talk|edits) said:

7 April 2014
I am flight crew for a major airline and I would deduct NONE of those things. My co-workers say they deduct all kind of stuff, but I doubt it would stand up against an audit. Black socks required for our uniforms are suitable for everyday wear. Grooming? Nope. Sunglasses? I don't know of any airline that requires sunglasses as part of the uniform. The actual uniform pieces, though, are not suitable for everyday wear in my opinion and I would deduct those.

The big deduction for flight crew (and it's a PITA to figure out) is the meals and entertainment expense on Form 2106. All the airlines pay in per diem far less than what is deemed allowable by the IRS, so the difference between what the airline actually pays their flight crew and what is allowable ends up being a pretty big 2% misc. deduction, especially if they fly internationally regularly. You can figure it out by hand with his/her printed schedules, if you're lucky the airline will do the computation for them, or you can use a website like ezperdiem.com to figure out the meals and entertainment allowance. Most flight crew pay union dues, so that sometimes is a good-sized 2% misc. deduction as well.

Frankly (talk|edits) said:

7 April 2014
Bubba's Qwik 'n EZ Tax Refund Service says they're deductible.

Tkelly911 (talk|edits) said:

14 April 2014
I'll bet Bubba's Qwik 'n EZ does a lot of firefighter returns as well.

Terry Oraha (talk|edits) said:

14 April 2014
I was trying to be funny. As usual, I failed

for some reason that in itself was funny :)

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